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Men who have sex with men (MSM), and in particular, MSM who identify as African-American or Black (BMSM), historically have been, and continue to be, the group most heavily impacted by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in the United States [1,2].While MSM comprise approximately 2% of the US population, 67% of all new HIV diagnoses in 2014 occurred among men who identify as gay, bisexual, or same gender loving [3].In an effort to expand upon current testing approaches, alternative venue HIV prevention outreach efforts that target MSM have emerged.These approaches include behavioral education programs focused on HIV testing uptake, mobile HIV testing in public and semipublic places (eg, parks, streets, community spaces), and linking HIV testing with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender–identified services (eg, community centers) [12].Indeed, there is evidence that fear of stigmatization may negatively impact patients’ health-related quality of life, adherence to treatment regimens, and HIV risk behaviors [11].In light of the facts that (1) HIV testing is a critical entry point to engagement in HIV care, and (2) multiple barriers discourage MSM from routinely HIV testing, it is worth exploring novel, nonstandard approaches to offering HIV testing services to this population.

Alternative routes to HIV testing and counseling that are easy to access, offer relative anonymity, can be conducted at home, and offer support by a peer educator may be particularly appealing for MSM.

This study examined the feasibility of self-administered, at-home HIV testing with Web-based peer counseling to MSM by using an interactive video chatting method.

The aims of this study were to (1) determine whether individuals would participate in at-home HIV testing with video chat-based test counseling with a peer counselor, (2) address logistical barriers to HIV testing that individuals who report risk for HIV transmission may experience, and (3) reduce anticipated HIV stigma, a primary psychosocial barrier to HIV testing.

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The aims of this study were to (1) determine whether individuals would participate in at-home HIV testing with video chat–based test counseling with a peer counselor, (2) address logistical barriers to HIV testing that individuals who report risk for HIV transmission may experience, and (3) reduce anticipated HIV stigma, a primary psychosocial barrier to HIV testing.