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Expressly named were "Wiltshire, Hampshire, Berkshire and Bimshire". Guyana) of 1652 there is a reference to Bim as a possible corruption of 'Byam', the name of a Royalist leader against the Parliamentarians.

That source suggested the followers of Byam became known as 'Bims' and that this became a word for all Barbadians.

And though they may share the same warm sun and soft sand, no two islands are the same.

Snorkel in Jamaica, kayak Grand Cayman, or unwind at a secluded Bahamian beach.

It is unclear whether "bearded" refers to the long, hanging roots of the bearded fig-tree (Ficus citrifolia), indigenous to the island, or to the allegedly bearded Caribs once inhabiting the island, or, more fancifully, to a visual impression of a beard formed by the sea foam that sprays over the outlying reefs.

In 1519, a map produced by the Genoese mapmaker Visconte Maggiolo showed and named Barbados in its correct position.

In 2016, Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index ranked Barbados sixth in the Americas after Canada, the United States, Uruguay, Chile and the Bahamas.

therein, it is about 168 km (104 mi) east of the islands of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and 400 km (250 mi) north-east of Trinidad and Tobago.

In 1966, Barbados became an independent state and Commonwealth realm with the British monarch (presently Queen Elizabeth II) as hereditary head of state. Despite being classified as an Atlantic island, Barbados is considered to be a part of the Caribbean, where it is ranked as a leading tourist destination.

Forty percent of the tourists come from the UK, with the US and Canada making up the next large groups of visitors to the island.

The National Cultural Foundation of Barbados says that "Bim" was a word commonly used by slaves and that it derives from the Igbo term bém from bé mụ́ meaning 'my home, kindred, kind', The words 'Bim' and 'Bimshire' are recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionaries.

Another possible source for 'Bim' is reported to be in the Agricultural Reporter of 25 April 1868, where the Rev. Greenidge (father of one of the island's most famous scholars, Abel Hendy Jones Greenidge) suggested the listing of Bimshire as a county of England.